The Multi-Genre Approach in Kill Bill Narratives

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The story of the film is very clear and it is a similar story like many other female protagonist films except for it’s deep roots in martial arts and its narration. The story is the story of a The Bride seeking revenge. She’s seeking revenge on her former boss and father of her child and the organization that tried to kill her.

The different genres Tarantino uses to narrate Kill Bill are, “…Spaghetti Western, Italian horror, animation, black comedy, kung-fu, crime/mob, action, and thriller/suspense with movement across and between the various genres (Braynt & Frahm, 2011, p. 801)”. A spaghetti western is a type of western made in Europe/Italy and black comedy in this context means dark or grim satire. According to Brown and Frahm this multi-genre approach offers something for everyone.

The narration of the film interprets that the Bride is the hero of the story. According to Brown and Frahm, “…Her experience is complex…throughout the narrative she is also portrayed as the victim, the villain, and one who overcomes adversity (2011, p. 802-803)”.  The bride has to face challenges, make decisions that question her moral character, and ultimately she is still an assassin whether she left her assassin group the DiVAS or not. Either way in order to fulfill her vengeance she has to kill them before she gets to Bill. A great example of this is her battle with Vernita Green her former assassin partner. The Bride has to make a decision to kill Veronica or leave because Veronica’s daughter is home from school. An example of how the film uses dark comedy, after The Bride kills Vernita, she looks at her daughter and says, “When you grow up, if you still feel raw about it, I’ll be waiting (Tarantino, 2003)”.

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Berger, A. A. (2012). Fourth edition media analysis techniques. Sage.

Bryant, M., & Frahm, J. (2011). ‘Kill Bill’ and the change agent: A multi-genre approach to organizational stories. Journal Of Management & Organization, 17(6), 797-811

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